Garden Journal 8.4.22

Hello and welcome to my garden journal. It’s been a while, but I hope you’ll stick around for what I hope will be an interesting trot through my recent gardening ways.

You may remember that at the end of January, I was heading into a gardens and parks consultancy role for the National Trust, in the super-large Midlands and East region. This in effect means that for the first time in years, more years than I care to remember, I won’t have a ‘work’ garden to directly manage; which I’m still struggling to get to grips with to be fair.

Swirling patterns in stone balustrade at Upton House Warwickshire by Gary Webb
Stunning stonework at Upton House & Garden

In fact, the first question numerous people have asked during introductions has often been “How are you going to adapt to a ‘hands-off’ role?” Well, in all honesty it will have to remain a ‘suck it and see’ exercise, because if we don’t try new things or dip our toes in the water, if we don’t walk through the door when it opens; then how do we know if we’re in the right place? Only time will tell.

There is though a couple of tricks up my sleeve, which I hope will satisfy my thirst for physical, active gardening. The first, having taken over a new garden at home at the end of last summer, is brand new garden project that is pretty much a blank canvas.

Just taking a breather whilst enjoying some digging…

It is a bland, largely grass and clay-based plot I have to say, and with economics the way they are, it’s certainly not going to become an overnight show garden. But what an opportunity this little garden presents; such an opportunity that I’ve hardly dare touch it for months whilst I’ve pondered the options. I’ve studied the light and shade, and frost-pockets since day one, so at this point I’ve worked out where’s best for a seating area or two. I know where my potted and long suffering sun loving plants need to go, along with those that will be happier in the shade.

The most challenging aspect, which isn’t entirely unexpected in a new development I guess, is the soil. Well, when I say soil, I mean subsoil. From the moment I dug out the base for the shed, to the moment I planted a new sapling in the front garden, my concerns over the quality of the soil were confirmed.

Digging this lot into new borders will make all the difference, I hope… Let’s also hope it’s not also full of nasties…

However, if I’m to maintain my presence as a gardener, my lot is to work with what I have, and so this week arrived a bulk bag of well-rotted manure, of which 1/3rd is already part dug into a new border I’m working on. There’s a long way to go before I can crouch down and plant, but I’ve made a start, by investing in what matters most; the soil. Just watch the weeds grow now!

The other trick up my sleeve, so to speak, is of course our family allotment, which has given my veggie growing ambitions a new lease of life already. We took on the new allotment at the very same time as the new home garden last year, and we’ve all thoroughly enjoyed visiting on fair-weather days.

Sun set lighting up allotment sheds in Warwickshire. By Gary Webb
Sun setting on a productive session on the plot.

Our boys have been there with us most times, and have both dug holes. Well, to clarify, they’ve dug one hole each. Every time they visit, they dig a little more out of ‘their’ hole, and it quickly reached the point where they had to cover over said holes to make them safe whilst we were away. But they’re digging, my boys are actually enjoying digging! We just need to figure out what they can do next with each hole, so any suggestions would be happily received!

There’s a good deal to do yet before it becomes the productive oasis I’m envisioning, and I’m absolutely certain we’ll have lots of fails and disasters. But, and this has been a huge surprise to me and my better half, if we go on to have as many satisfying fresh air filled moments as we have thus far enjoyed; we’re in for an absolute treat.

Carrots & parsnips going in! 🤞🏼🥕🥕🥕

Don’t forget, when you’re a horticulturist and get yourself an allotment, it’s hard not to feel a touch of pressure. What I will say though is we, the royal ‘we’ that is, have already grown in confidence. Our first seeds were sown direct last weekend, and there’s a range of seedlings growing in the warmth of a growing frame at home; where I can keep a close eye on them. Can’t you tell I’m having a ball? Maybe I’ll be able to survive the day job after all!

Speaking of the day job, the adjustment has been quite a big deal I have to say, but without doubt, the best elements so far have been the opportunities I’ve had to meet fellow gardeners and tour their gardens. It’s already given me different perspectives and I’ve much more insight now to their working worlds. The organisation has grown hugely since I departed in 2008, and its work, its people, and their ambition is incredible.

The orangery (or maybe camellia 🤔) house at Belton House.

If there is a down side, it’s the good deal of time spent worshiping a laptop, which for someone more suited to praying to a potting bench, or anointing a freshly sharpened pair of pruners; takes some adjustment. It’s also made blogging pretty awkward, as the last thing you want is more screen time blogging after a day on a PC! But, and it’s a big but; I’ve had some brilliant hours away from the screen, and I’ve spent quality time with some very talented gardeners in some stunning gardens. Plus, I’ve hugged some INCREDIBLE trees! 🌳

OK, enough is enough, I know you need to get on and do things, or check Instagram or TikTok, so I’ll thank you now for your valuable time; I’m very grateful you stopped by. I’ll nip away if I may to continue establishing in my new role, to fork-out more couch grass at the allotment, and to smash my spade through solid clumps of drying clay in my home garden.

If you’d like to have a look at progress on our allotment, you can find us over on Instagram: @allotofpotential

Kind regards, Gary – Gardening Ways

Becoming a Gardener

Becoming a Gardener.

~

Birds will call you to the garden each waking moment,

Then, you will find yourself working amongst them whilst appreciating

Their melodies, their objections, and their interest in your gardening.

~

Gardening will cease to be a chore when each action has deeper meaning,

When each action contributes not only to your garden

But to your neighbourhood, your planet, and to your wellbeing.

~

Each plant will share its special qualities with you at any given moment,

A moment when you could be anywhere else, but you will be there,

And rapidly any worry or toil that plant ever caused will be gone.

~

Be they lovely, harmed, harmful or full of delight and promise,

Every leaf, stem, flower and insect may present a new discovery for you,

And every voyage will become a journey of learning and fascination.

~

Time spent feeding the soil, sowing seeds, planting or looking,   

Lifting a pendulous flower or tickling your palm across soft spring growth

Will be an earthing occasion, connecting you with the world around you;

It will restore you and will never be time wasted.

~

Sometimes achievements will be crushed and losses will feel harsh yet,

The challenges are always worth rising to, and in the process a balance

Will be found that will nourish your heart, mind and soul.

Your back may need a little extra care though I have to say.

~

To know now that a plant or garden grew from your effort,

To know that ecology or the community may have unknowingly benefitted

From your guiding hand and watchful eye,

Is to know that you became a gardener, you contributed,

And you created life through your gardening.

~

Become a gardener and make a difference.

Gary Webb, June 2019

I’d love to hear why you became a gardener, what you get out of gardening, or what prevents you from seeing yourself as a gardener.

Regards,

Gary