Garden Journal 29.5.21

Hello and thanks for clicking the link to my garden journal. This week I’ve written about fading tulips, the day the rains came and general glasshouse busy-ness. I also mention a garden move on the home front, (as opposed to a house move,) and introduce a new section about observation.

Tulips Fade


I last updated my garden journal on the May 19 when tulips were very clearly stealing my show. In some cases they continue to flower well but, I’m sad to say, many have now gone over. It has though been a dazzling year for them with cooler temperatures playing a useful role in slowing things down, although now it does seem like the show is nearing its end as each tulip one by one gracefully bows out.

Bright yellow Tulip ‘Yokohama’ flowers fading towards the end of their season
Tulip ‘Yokohama’ on the slide…

The Rains Came


I say gracefully, but for the second week in a row the weather has been all over the place; in fact the whole of May has been. Monday last brought very heavy and prolonged showers with added hail for good measure, and at my work’s garden of Sulgrave Manor, following a morning of it, all I could do was head indoors, again, to dry out.

Garden Journal 19.5.21

Hello and thanks for clicking the link to my garden journal. This week I’m not afraid to say it’s Tulip Mania!

Tulip Focus

When assembling my journal entries I tend to look back across images I’ve snapped since my last post, and right now as I pause to look back there’s one particular plant that features heavily in my photos file – Tulipa!

There has been a good deal of gardening activity completely unrelated to tulips of course, but for this journal entry I thought I’d focus completely on these little beauties that by sheer fortune have bounced back into my life over the last few years.

Tulip ‘Sunlover’ at Sulgrave Manor

Looking Back

To track back just a little, in autumn 2019 I found myself planting many tulips in pots and borders for Rachel de Thame in her beautiful Cotswolds garden. It was a real treat being introduced to some lovely varieties, but more than that it was brilliant to see how they can work together when carefully selected by someone with a very keen eye. To say I learned a great deal would be something of an understatement!

Garden Journal 2.5.21

Hello and thanks for taking a few moments to drop by and read my garden journal. This post covers National Gardening Week, Heritage Open Days, Sulgrave Manor, and a short update about my own plot at home – honestly I don’t seem to have had a spare moment – but it’s all been about gardens so I haven’t minded a bit!

Oh, and you presently find me writing outside in my garden, moving my little table around every once in a while to stay in the warmth of the sun – long may it last today!

I’m presently writing at the end of a pretty active and thought provoking National Gardening Week, which I’m glad to say encourages people to get their dose of green or ‘Vitamin G’. It wasn’t without a buzz of joy when I heard of this year’s theme for the week and the opportunity it presented to extol the virtues of gardens and gardening for wellbeing.

My Gardeners’ World Video

I’m delighted to record that after watching BBC Gardeners’ World on my screens for what seems like an eternity, I finally made it onto the screen myself! Okay, it was a video I’d sent in about me and my garden but still – I’m very chuffed for my clip to have been selected, and I’ll be walking around with a rosy glow on my cheeks for the weekend at least!

At home, Spring 2021

Last Spring

I’ve written in my journal before about how the pandemic impacted my gardening world, in as much that whilst enduring the first lockdown I was fortunate to be able to continue working. I say fortunate because I live for working with, in and around gardens, and to think of having to stay indoors, or to have been restricted to a small space would likely, well, I can’t even begin to think.

Garden Journal 18.4.21

Hello and thanks for dropping in on my garden journal. This week I’ve my own update on Sulgrave Manor Gardening, an important Peat Free April message plus a little Home Gardening for the sarnie filling.

Sulgrave Manor Gardening


Writing in my garden journal last week I talked about the pre-opening rush that the garden team and I were going through to make sure all was looking good for the opening day on Wednesday. If you’re a gardener you’ll likely be very familiar with the thoughts and feelings that are very present in the run up to the big day.

Garden Journal 11.4.21

Well it has been quite a full month since I last posted to my garden journal, after taking a break for a while to take stock. I’m back now though and keen as ever to resume the weekly posting of my horticultural happenings to this journal, which is part of my Gardening Ways blog.

I suppose then that I’ve four weeks of shenanigans to account for, but whilst I’ve scanned back across the weeks and selected some memory jogging images, I’ll spare you from the general daily going’s on. Instead, and from my chosen picture, I’m going to skip across the month all spring lamb-like, if you can picture that!

Sulgrave Gardening

In my last journal entry I was still harping on about the “ongoing pruning” in the heritage orchard at Sulgrave Manor, which I’m glad to say is now all complete. In fact it’s more than complete, as some of the volunteers have thankfully returned to the fold, coming to my aid with a very thorough clean up of cut material – I had stacked it nicely of course!

Amongst the branches of an apple tree in a heritage orchard Up amongst the branches…

In addition to completing the orchard, which is now resplendent with thousands of daffodils and a few Continue reading

My Sensory Garden

Do you have a sensory garden? If not, are you sure?

I find myself sitting at a little bistro table in my garden with fingertips poised near the keyboard. It’ll be my first post for a few weeks you see, after life, as it does, got a little heavy. But with a few moments of peace available I’m determined to reignite my writing brain and post something interesting, or useful at least so here goes; a post about my sensory garden.

Blue hyacinth flowers in a rusting, tin pot, in the garden
Hyacinths punch well above their weight in terms of scent – these are incredible!

Sense of Smell

Journal 7.3.21

I’ve arrived at garden journal time this weekend perplexed as to how the week has flown by, although as always, it doesn’t take me long to work it out, what with switching between homeschooling and working. Seriously though, despite some full days it does seem to have been another week of maximum effort, modest achievement.

What I can say is that it’s been another fully and engaging week of work in my field of ‘gardening’. It’s seen me up and down ladders whilst pruning in a heritage orchard, arranging servicing for machinery and contacting volunteers, and there was even a little COSHH thrown in for good measure.

A little mulching on the go…

There was a session of mulching ornamental borders, sowing seeds and moving some heavy ornamental pots. Pruning tools were cleaned, sharpened and oiled, and a good deal of my present book was thoroughly enjoyed – The Tulip, by Anna Pavord. Last but not least, there was another fascinating webinar with the discerning historic landscape expert John Phibbs.

Journal 28.2.21

And just like that it’s journal time, and as for last Sunday’s entry the weather has again brought huge change to my gardening week. It’s as if Mother Nature popped in on Thursday, waved a magic wand and said “let there be sunshine!”

Crocus flowering in my garden ☀️

It really does feel like spring has sprung if I’m honest but, (and there’s always a but) from a gardening perspective I wouldn’t get too used to these temperatures for they may very well be short lived. I’m certainly not wanting to pour water on these beautiful days though as they are so welcome, if only to prove to me that the growing season is actually happening – so I may just have to crawl out from under my rock and get used to it!